Seattle Education Access


Seattle Education Access helps young people earn higher education degrees by addressing all the barriers between them and academic success. SEA's individualized, holistic model is designed to support students as they prepare to enter higher education through graduation day. Our mission is "to provide higher education advocacy and opportunity to young people struggling to overcome poverty and adversity."

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Website:http://www.seattleeducationaccess.org
Address:6920 Roosevelt Way NE #355
Seattle, WA 98115
Matching Funds:Not Reported
For questions, contact nonprofit directly.
Email:katy@seattleeducationaccess.org
Phone Number:206-523-3662
EIN:04-3602577
Seattle Education Access (SEA) was founded in 2002 to help homeless young people prepare for higher education and persist through graduation. While other college access programs help students in traditional high schools transfer directly to college after graduation, SEA is the only college access program in Washington that focuses on students who have experienced homelessness, are single parents, are immigrants, and those who did not successfully complete high school. Our program objectives are to provide caring, culturally competent college access, navigation, and retention services. With intensive, one-on-one mentorship we help each student create a life and academic plan so they have the support and resources needed to succeed in school and become self-sufficient.

In 2011, SEA relocated program staff to partner sites to be more accessible to students in areas with high rates of poverty and educational inequity. SEA staff are now stationed throughout King County so students can get support at a convenient location and time for them. Collaborative partnerships with over 30 agencies, including community colleges, GED programs, alternative high schools, basic needs centers, and housing programs, are at the core of SEA's service model. Though our students come from poverty and adversity, 81% of our college-enrolled students have either have graduated or are in good academic standing. By comparison, only 58% of community college students graduate, regardless of socioeconomic background.